LA BRUJULA DORADA EPUB

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brújula dorada'. Download and Read Free Online La Brújula Dorada. lacado , La Materia Oscura III (B de Books) (Spanish Edition) by Philip Pullman EPub. las apariencias engañan, y que los peligros y las maravillas pueden irrumpir en cualquier momento. El libro en el que se basa la película 'La brújula dorada'. The Golden Compass book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Lyra is rushing to the cold, far North, where witch clans an .


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There are witches, gypsies, daemons, and best of all--armored polar bears! The warrior bears have a spectacular battle scene towards the end that still shakes me to the core when I read it. There aren't words enough to describe what an important work of literature this is, not only for children, but also for thinking, feeling, dreaming adults as well.

I really liked this book! I think it is easily among the best of the crop of Potter-era YA lit even though it actually came out first! The movie was just ok. I thought the lead kid did a good job playing Lyra, and Nicole Kidman made a very menacing Ann Coulter. Serafina Pekkala is one of my favorite witches in literature: She is also tragically romantic, because she is cursed with watching the man she loves die, because he's mortal.

But I think that is in the second book. It made no sense and did not follow the book at all! For one thing, they changed the name, which I do not get. Maybe it was the British name? But I don't remember any casinos in the second book. And not only do they have Serafina and Asriel dressed all wrong, they have them get together!!! That does NOT happen in the books. Also Lyra isn't even in it, hello? Facebook 30 Day Book Challenge Day Book whose main character you want to marry.

Um, Serafina. Not Asriel. Just to be clear. View all 51 comments. Apr 01, Darth J rated it liked it Shelves: I never added a review of this but I'm going to now. I'll admit that this one was a bit slow for me at parts especially compared to the sequels but what kept me reading was the fascination with the daemons. I liken them to the patronuses patronii? How many other people have held conversations about what their daemon or patronus animal is, and then changed it fre I never added a review of this but I'm going to now.

How many other people have held conversations about what their daemon or patronus animal is, and then changed it frequently?

I'll also admit that I don't particularly care for Lyra.

I find her too abrasive for my liking as she seems to always have a chip on her shoulder and wants to turn everything into a fight. The titular object at least in the American version of the book is an Alethiometer, a clock-like divination device that she can use. The character who I really liked and thought we needed much more of was Serafina Pekkala, Queen of the Witches.

Not only was she boss with a bow, but she was always magical flying astride her cloud pine branch. All in all, 3 stars when compared to the sequels.

Read when I was younger about 8 years ago I reckon didn't really think much of it and only made it half way through book 2. Reckon I would like to try it again if that day ever arrives View all 8 comments.

Aug 25, David Schaafsma rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a second reading of Pullman's classic, accomplished on vacation in a car, with the family, by listening to the 9 cd audio collection, with Phillip Pullman Himself reading the narration and beautifully, and a cast of fine actors taking various parts.

The first of a trilogy entitled His Dark Materials, which is a great fantasy story supposedly appropriate for grade 6 American schools but is really all ages, and like Wrinkle in Time, has dimensions in it which you will discover at any age This is a second reading of Pullman's classic, accomplished on vacation in a car, with the family, by listening to the 9 cd audio collection, with Phillip Pullman Himself reading the narration and beautifully, and a cast of fine actors taking various parts.

The first of a trilogy entitled His Dark Materials, which is a great fantasy story supposedly appropriate for grade 6 American schools but is really all ages, and like Wrinkle in Time, has dimensions in it which you will discover at any age.

It IS a kid's book, in so many ways, with a strong girl main character, Lyra, 11, who is set on freeing her friend and other children from the north, with the help of Gyptions, an armored polar bear, witches, a Texan aeronaut balloonist, among others.

This first volume is wonderful fun, focused as it is on Lyra and adventure.

Lyra is a pretty unforgettable young girl character, who really grows over the trilogy, and others also take the stage, but in this book she is up there front and center. The series is also a commentary on and critique of C. Lewis's The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe series, which Pullman, an atheist, found as he finds all Christian materials, too simplistic about the nature of the universe. Pullman once commented that he finds it interesting that he is placed in the category of "fantasy" writer, which he thinks is evidence of the narrowness of vision that dominates the planet.

Pullman especially finds the notion of Original Sin, which is the very foundation of the Dutch Calvinist Reformed Church in which I grew up, reprehensible, certainly limiting as a foundation for life. I think the Catholic Church, seeing Pullman as an atheist and his work as an exclusively anticlerical tract, helped to crush the continuation of the fine film series, which only has one third of the story, this book, produced, though that film was tame compared to the book.

But I think it is more about the nature of True Religion than anti-religion, and I think Pullman says as much himself. The series also owes a lot to Milton's Paradise Lost, which will become more evident as the series goes along, though you don't have to know that to appreciate the tales. Pullman loves Milton, and also argues with him, too. As with Warner Brothers cartoons, there's a kid level and an adult level on which you can appreciate the wonder of the tales.

But it's not just a fantasy adventure! As with all great literature, it's about what is at stake in making meaning. It's a great classic. But enough about all that theology jazz! Lyra is the hero of this first volume and ultimately of the whole series. She is a liar Pullman pronounces her name Lie-rah , a storyteller, fantasist, without which she could literally not survive.

We named our daughter after this main character, so you know I am a fan, though we pronounce the name Lee-rah as in Lyrical. Set in a parallel universe, it features the journey of Lyra Belacqua to the Arctic in search of her missing friend, Roger Parslow, and her imprisoned uncle, Lord Asriel, who has been conducting experiments with a mysterious substance known as "Dust". Apr 05, Emma rated it it was amazing Shelves: When a film was made of this book, they did the book a real disservice.

This book is amazing. Lyra is the feisty protagonist, an inveterate liar, clever, passionate and loyal. She achieves the impossible, rescues an armoured bear, befriends the witches, and rescues children from a fate worse than death- literally. Pullman does a great job realising this alternate world where everyone has a daemon- like the other half of your soul - and these creatures stay with you through your life.

As adults t When a film was made of this book, they did the book a real disservice. As adults they take on a settled form, one which says something about your character, but as children, their form is still unsettled and changes when and as needed. Lord Asraiel and Mrs Coulter make perfect villains. This book does not really end but segues into the second book. This was a reread and I listened to it on audio. They did a fantastic job, I have to say, with different actors for all the voices.

Jul 14, Oceana rated it did not like it Recommends it for: This book was recommended to me somewhere in fandom as a children's book that is also interesting to adults. I admit that I wasn't particularly impressed with it, and I can't see it as something that I would give my kids to read. My main complaint is the "means to an end" style the author uses. A bit like in a computer game, our main character Lyra runs from one wise man to another in her quest to find some missing children.

This is practical, because except for one scene in the beginning, she d This book was recommended to me somewhere in fandom as a children's book that is also interesting to adults. This is practical, because except for one scene in the beginning, she doesn't have to find out things herself, since the wise men will always tell her wat to do and what is going on in long, question-answer dialogues which will reveal the next part of the plot.

Nothing is ever really set up to lead somewhere, unlike for example in Harry Potter where everything leads to something in the end, everything is happening in dialogue, which sounded so constructed and goal-oriented that it rarely ever convinced me. The narrator is probably supposed to be an all-knowing narrator sorry, don't know the english term for that , but he slips into Lyra's POV with no pattern I could discover.

And the fact that I even noticed this shows how disturbing it was.

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The protagonist is, well, I don't know why anyone writing children's book would invent an "unimaginative" quote , lying, sometimes even hateful character like Lyra. I started to like her a bit more during the second half of the book, but mostly because I felt sorry for her.

Then I discovered that she is supposed to be older than 11, when she makes herself younger by telling someone that she is eleven. Until the I had thought she was maybe 8 or 9. Shortly after that I stopped reading the book. After having read numerous other reviews of this book, I feel the need to point out that I'm an atheist and that no, I didn't give this book a bad review because it "offended my christianity".

In fact, I seem to be so much an atheist that I completely missed how the book could be controversial or offensive in that regard. I know it offended me by being a bad book sold with a lot of hype, but that's not Pullman's fault. However, I did read that Pullman called himself an agnostic somewhere, and that explains rather a lot to me. View all 11 comments. View all 13 comments. I really like that the Iorek Byronison, the bear, is always referred to by full name.

When I'm Bear King, I definitely want to be on a full-name-all-the-time basis.

Then I will battle challengers to mortal combat, tearing through armor, swiping off heads with my massive paws, slicing open chests and devouring hearts. And as I gorge myself on bear blood, I will cry out "Bears! Who is your King? My name has got that sam I really like that the Iorek Byronison, the bear, is always referred to by full name. My name has got that same elegant mysterious beauty. Like a sound you'd expect if you hit a fairy with a shoe. View 2 comments. Lyra is bound to stay in Oxford to learn and play with her friends, however, when talk of Gobblers arise with children disappearing, and with her close friend Roger being one of those children, Lyra, along with her daemon, Pantalaimon, set out and are determined to find his whereabouts.

Their quest leads 4. Their quest leads them North, where there are armoured fighting bears who rule their own kingdoms, and clans of witches flying through the nights sky- however there are also scientists conducting abhorrent experiments that are very dark and horrible, which questions everything on the scales of morality.

Lyra constantly faces and overcomes strange terrors and events, always questioning and determined to find out important answers. Where are the missing children going? What is dust and why is it so important!? Through this grand task Lyra sets herself, she encounters the most interesting people and creatures- Lyra must determine whether these are allies or foe, as the wrong decision can have severe consequences.

Lyra is a heroine I absolutely love. Flawed, curious, determined, fiercely passionate and brave. There was a great selection of secondary characters as well some more lovable than others!

I am absolutely fascinated by the world that Philip Pullman has created as well as the creatures, objects alethiometer and dust mentioned in the book. This novel was beautifully written and was a wonderful and fantastical literary adventure. Philip Pullman has the ability to blend theology and magic into a parallel world and create a mesmerising story. View all 19 comments. May 17, Malanie rated it really liked it Shelves: Lyra is the most adorable thing in the entire world.

I wish Harry would. My favorite thing about The Golden Compass is the concept of a daemon. Your daemon is actually considered your soul, and it can read your emotions as well as you can read theirs. He comforts her!!!! And when they are separated by a mere few feet, they begin to sob with love and pain, because they just want to be together?????? Other than that, the prose is gorgeous; beautiful, dusty-library, English writing. I wanted to wrap it around myself like a soft pastel flowery rainbow afghan.

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And the supporting cast was fso lovable and complex, especially because they adored Lyra so much. Everyone nurtured Lyra. It has that classic aesthetic, complex characters, and daemons are the best thing I can possibly imagine. I live for soulmates, two people who are unable to go on without one another like Achilles and Pat from The Song of Achilles.

I was tremendously happy and devastated because of the chaos that goes down TW: It had been like 12 years since I read this book and I'd been meaning to re-read it for ages——so I finally got around to it, and I fell in love with it all over again. There's so much I love about The Golden Compass. Sorry I'm saying "love" so much, oops. Lyra is awesome, and what I especially appreciate about her is that she's such a realistically flawed character. It's challenging to write a believable child protagonist, but I think Philip Pullman does it perfectly.

Plus I love Pan and the strong bond he and Lyra share. Oh and I love Lee Scoresby I'm just going to stop now before I name all the characters. I only have a couple of minor complaints about this book upon re-reading it: I feel like those themes went over my head as a kid, but reading it as an adult I'm like, " But anyway, I really enjoyed my re-read of this and I'm looking forward to reading the other two books in the trilogy! View all 14 comments. Mar 25, Brad rated it really liked it Recommended to Brad by: China Mieville.

After all the talk about Pullman's supposed anti-Catholicism or anti-Christianity or atheism or whatever one wants to label it, I approached The Golden Compass known originally as Northern Lights with an open mind and found something other than what I'd been told to expect.

I found elements that questioned Christianity and Catholicism and the nature of God and its works, but I also found elements that questioned parental authority, the ethical and practical roles of Science, and the nature of After all the talk about Pullman's supposed anti-Catholicism or anti-Christianity or atheism or whatever one wants to label it, I approached The Golden Compass known originally as Northern Lights with an open mind and found something other than what I'd been told to expect.

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I found elements that questioned Christianity and Catholicism and the nature of God and its works, but I also found elements that questioned parental authority, the ethical and practical roles of Science, and the nature of good and evil. And it is this consistent questioning that I see as the message of Pullman's first book of "His Dark Materials" -- not any of those messages that were focused on during the movie's release. The notion that we should question everything, even if we are children -- or especially if we are children -- is one of the most important messages humankind can hear, and one of the hardest for us to learn or employ.

Most people simply do not want to question. It takes work; it takes struggle; it takes strength, and far more strength than unquestioning faith or simple acceptance require. The fact that Lyra questions everything around her at all times is her salvation. And ours if we would only learn the lesson. Say what you like about Pullman's story, but regardless of your religion or politics or economics or taste he does something brave that needs to be respected -- he challenges us to think about everything.

Even his book with its flaws I understand that he can't maintain the amazing level of The Golden Compass, nee Northern Lights, in the books that follow, but I am compelled to read them to see for myself. I think Pullman would appreciate that. View all 7 comments. Four years ago I adopted a puppy, and when I saw her the first time I named her with a name I thought was just a series of letters that I made up: If anyone asked me why I named her that way, I would tell it was because of the greek musical instrument, but deep down I knew it came straight to my heart from some unknown source.

Then, a couple of months ago, I heard someone talk about this book and I remembered: Lyra Belacqua, how could i forget about the main character of my favo Four years ago I adopted a puppy, and when I saw her the first time I named her with a name I thought was just a series of letters that I made up: Lyra Belacqua, how could i forget about the main character of my favourite book when I was younger?

That's where the forgotten memory came from! This book meant so much at the time, that I really think that, even though I always loved to read, this is for me what people call "the book that made me fall in love with books". And as I read it again, all the memories and the emotions I felt the first time came back to me and I must admit my eyes got wet more than once.

You see, while I was reading this again I realized how much this and all the other books I read and loved when I was a girl really made me who I am now as an adult; from here comes my all-time biggest dream of seeing the northern lights, the love from the snow and maybe, ultimately, the reason why I decided to move north where I live now.

As you may guess from above, I don't think I am the best person to review this book in an objective manner, but I will try my best. This is an old young adult book, so if you love modern young adult you will probably find it difficult to fall in love with this one, because of the concepts it contains which can feel a little "retro". But what I think it's immortal, is the undeniable talent of the author as writer and storyteller, because he was able to create such complex and lovable or hatable characters, such a dense and well-paced plot, and an atmosphere so engrossing that you just can't put it down.

The reality of this world is uncovered in exactly the right moments; the chapters are the perfect length and the cliffhanger at the end just makes me crave for more! Oh I am so happy i decided to pick this up again!!! As in Rowling's series, the hero of The Golden Compass --Lyra, a pre-teen girl in Oxford, England--is plucked from her mundane existence to become supremely important to the fate of the living world.

However, unlike the Potter series, The Golden Compass , immerses us immediately in political, religious, and cultural conflict as well. While the central character is indeed a child, which lands this title in the The Golden Compass , by Philip Pullman, picks up where the Harry Potter series leaves off.

While the central character is indeed a child, which lands this title in the children's section, the themes and conflicts in the novel are often very adult, the action sometimes gruesome, and characters' behaviors and motivations quite complex.

The sophistication of the story will be lost over children's heads. Nonetheless, the action will sustain.

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For children, The Golden Compass is the story of Lyra Belacqua's adventure to the arctic to rescue her friend Roger, who has been kidnapped by adults who run experiments on children. The story is set loosely in our world and in the past, but in Pullman's revision, every human being has a "daemon" that is a physical manifestation of that person's soul in the form of an animal that is psychically, or perhaps spiritually, connected to the person.

The experiments involve the investigation into and hideous manipulation of that connection. Along the way, Lyra meets talking bears, flying witches, and much, much more. For adults, the novel asks questions about the relationship between religion and science. It explores political coercion and subterfuge. It examines class differences. The result of all of this is a multi-layered novel.

It's fun, but also thought-provoking--and potentially scandalous. Do I recommend it?

Fun and thoughtful: Would I teach it? Hard to say. Likely not. It's a wonderful and intricate piece of writing--some of the passages are beautiful and the content generates many talking points--but much of it feels too overtly didactic.

Lasting impression: This is another magnificently realized escapist fantasy like the Harry Potter series. And, from the very beginning it is laden with complex political and social intrigue the stuff of which appears in "grown-up" fiction. I was looking forward to it so much because the premise sounded incredible and I was excited to hear Pullman's atheism woven into his work, but everything about this book was bland.

It was so slow moving and the characters were all so unlikable, I was honestly shocked that I was reading the same book that everyone else loved? Maybe it's because it lacked the nostalgia that a lot of people have with the series because I never read it as a child? I honestly don't think I'll continue on with the series even though I want to know what happens, but I'd honestly prefer to read plot summaries online rather than slog my way through 2 more boring af books.

Around the Year in 52 Books Challenge Notes: An award winning book View all 5 comments. Dec 19, Rebecca rated it liked it Recommends it for: This book started off strong, but by the end of the story, I felt that Pullman had sacrificed logic and direction for drama and suspense.

He did a good job of gradually making Lyra less of an ignorant brat and more of a noble little savage girl. Overall, I liked this book well enough to want to read the second one in the trilogy, but I had several problems with it: It took itself extremely seriously and was rarely light-hearted or This book started off strong, but by the end of the story, I felt that Pullman had sacrificed logic and direction for drama and suspense.

It took itself extremely seriously and was rarely light-hearted or playful. It bothers me when epic stories get a little bit too in love with a sense of their own epicness. He says maybe 20 sentences in the entire novel and his longest continuous presence in the book is when he's asleep in a balloon. Time for Lyra to get a better, more interesting, best friend, which I assume happens in book 2. It sounds like something Neville's grandmother would have given him in the HP series.

It doesn't tell the truth so much as do the dirty work of plot exposition for Pullman. Um, isn't that the kind of information that characters are supposed to figure out by being smart or making friends or discovering things on their own?

She has grown up in an Oxford College and has developed a detachment to her guardians. She spends her days enjoying her youth and harassing those that turn out to be some of her greatest allies. For her, this book is a journey of self-discovery: a way of exploring the limits of her character and potential. Her adventure sees her befriend an armoured polar bear and become the wielder of the golden compass. This is initially described as a lie detector but it is apparent that the depths of its power have not been fully explored.

It was very much like a clock, or a compass, for there were hands pointing around the dial, but instead of the hours or the points of a compass there were several little pictures with extraordinary precision, as if on ivory with the slenderest sable brush. She turned the dial around to look at them all. There was an anchor; an hourglass surmounted by a skull; a bull, a beehive…..

The world Pullman has created is physically intertwined with our own; there are references to cities and countries in which his idea has been planted. Each human has a daemon that is essentially their soul.

These take on the form of an animal that is representative of the person, for example someone who is enthusiastic and friendly has a colourful cat whereas as solider has a wolf or a hound. The author does very little to explain this. In this the author has created an air of mystery as we explore the true meaning of the bond as we read further. The plot is fantastic.

The author manages to surprise the reader on several occasions as he drops several, massive plot turns.Anagha Vratha Por favor,activa el JavaScript! Read Dos Count On It! You see, while I was reading this again I realized how much this and all the other books I read and loved when I was a girl really made me who I am now as an adult; from here comes my all-time biggest dream of seeing the northern lights, the love from the snow and maybe, ultimately, the reason why I decided to move north where I live now.

When I wanted to stop reading the first Larsson after pages and was told that it got good soon, well, honestly, I stuck with it and the advice was correct, but still. Tumhala teesavhya lagnachya wadh diwsachya manapasun khup khuoop shubheccha ani abhinandan. This isn't the simple issue some of you are trying to make it. According to another etymology, Agha means that which causes sufferings to remain vahinj ever. Raistlin, El Aprendiz De Mago: And it is this consistent questioning that I see as the message of Pullman's first book of "His Dark Materials" -- not any of those messages that were focused on during the movie's release.

Along the way, Lyra meets talking bears, flying witches, and much, much more.

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